Category Archives: Writing

A Writer in Search of a Book Idea

I’ve been following the pages of other book reviewers who blog, and I came across a review of Derek’s Revenge by Mac Black written by Rosie Amber.  I haven’t read the book, but her review begins like this: “Derek Toozlethwaite is a journalist in Newingsworth who is trying to write a book. So far he has failed to find a suitable subject for his book….”

Many of us would dearly love to write a book. More and more people are actually doing it now that they can self publish. Some of these people have a book inside them screaming to be written, and those writers live inside their books long before they enter them onto their keyboards. Their books nag them until they are written

Others, like Derek, know they want to write a book, but they have no idea what sort of book they will write. Perhaps I’m waiting for a book to rise up within me and demand to be written, but as yet it hasn’t. I can’t imagine writing any other way, because I need passion to write. I simply know my book, if it ever happens, will be nonfiction. I suspect it will have to do with nature, possibly of a devotional nature.  I feel the faintest stirring, but for now blogging and writing on content sites satisfies my writing urge. I have a long way to go to develop my craft so it will be ready if or when I become pregnant with a book.

Which type of writer are you? One who wants to write and goes looking for book ideas? Or one who is impelled to write a book which is already lurking in your mind and trying to take over? Or is there another way to approach book writing I haven’t considered?

 

 

What is a Writing Life?

 

Each writer’s life is different,  but Annie Dillard describes accurately the process we all go through in her book The Writing Life
.  Writers are constantly building with words, and then demolishing what they have built to create a more desirable piece of work. We ride waves of inspiration and translate them on our keyboards or notebooks. And then we get cold water dumped on us when we realize we need to delete and rewrite.

Living the writing life means that all else I do in life  contributes material for writing. I always learn and  observe as I live out my roles as wife, bookseller, photographer, cook, gardener, and the rest.  I write nonfiction exclusively, with an occasional bit of poetry. What I do, where I go, and those I meet often turn up in my articles, since I’m always asking myself which of my interactions or activities someone else would find entertaining, informative,  or thought-provoking.

The writing life is a curious life. I often ask questions such as

  • What if?
  • What else?
  • Why?
  • Why now?
  • Why not?
  • What is she thinking?
  • What is it?
  • How did it get there?

My writing life is one with plenty of solitude. It takes time alone to think, to reflect, to read, and, of course, to write. Perhaps others can write with people nearby. I can’t. I need uninterrupted time to organize my ideas and get them written. I also need quiet.

Quote: One can write in solitude, but not in a vaccumMy writing life is  a reading life.  One can write in solitude,  but not in a vacuum. Conversations and books provide ideas for me to interact with and build on.

My photographs are also an important component of my writing life. The camera lens often shows me what my eyes don’t .  My photos often suggest topics I hadn’t considered writing on, and motivate me to learn more about what I have captured with my camera.

Of course, that one thing all writers need is time to transfer their ideas into writing.  I am learning to be flexible and see interruptions and unscheduled activities that take me away from my computer as opportunities to learn something new I might be able to write about.

How do you handle interruptions in your writing life?