Tag Archives: Blogjob

Review: Will These Social Blogging Sites Survive?

A Selective History of Social Blogging Sites

The first social blogging site I joined was Bubblews. It lasted for almost three years. It was very popular and established writers from well known sites like HubPages devoted less time to writing for them because they were making more on Bubblews. This left HubPages weaker, and many people, including me, found it hard to just jump back in at HubPages after Bubblews stopped paying.

Social  blogging was easy, fun, and struck a chord for those of us who wanted to connect as people rather than just share information. Since the fall of Bubblews, people began looking for another social blogging site. Many went back to myLot, which had changed ownership and  gone back to paying members. It is a simple forum, but its new format also makes it ideal for social blogging.  This  got friends connected again, but social bloggers wanted something a bit different.

Many of those looking discovered BlogJob. BlogJob seemed to combine the best features of Bubblews and myLot. I have reviewed the state of BlogJob in Transition here.  Some people are still hanging on, but few are very active anymore. Once again the search is on for a new site. This week I’ve joined two new sites very similar to BlogJob.

Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites
Photo in Public Domain Courtesy of Pixabay.com

Literacy Base and BlogBourne — What They Have in Common

  • They are both a lot like BlogJob. They offer free hosting for social bloggers and they provide groups and forums for member interaction outside the blogs. Unlike BlogJob, though, one cannot have an independent WordPress Blog on either site such as BlogJob members have.
  • They are owned or administrated by people whose first language is not English. This means some of the site documentation has errors in standard English.
  • They both offer some form of compensation to those active on the sites
  • Both will pay members through PayPal. Literacy Base  also  pays through Payoneer.
  • Both provide members with referral links to share their articles and to recruit new members.
  • Both sites are currently experiencing growing pains and may go offline from time to time as they work out bugs. BlogBourne  officially launched August 1, 2016.

How Literacy Base and BlogBourne Differ: Payment

Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites
Photo in Public Domain Courtesy of Pixabay.com
  • BlogBourne splits site earnings with members, keeping 50% for site expenses and dividing the rest to to determine the value of a coin. This system is similar to the one Persona Paper was using. Literacy Base pays specific cash amounts for specific tasks like commenting or writing posts. The value of a BlogBourne coin fluctuates and is posted every month.
  • BlogBourne will be paying seven days after a person orders payment, but the payments won’t be issued the first time until two months after the site’s launch. BlogBourne payment amounts range from $5 to $100.  Literacy Base pays on  the tenth day of the month after a person has earned $10.
  • BlogBourne currently offers the same amount of coins for any post. Literacy Base at its own discretion pays more for higher quality interactions and longer posts.
  • Literacy Base currently has placed no limits on how much a member can earn in a day.  BlogBourne has a limit of  three posts per day and varying limits for other activities one can earn for.

How Literacy Base and BlogBourne Differ: Editors and Posting

  • On Literacy Base your blog post has to be approved before it will post. That can take up to 24 hours. If more people become active, that might increase the approval time. Moderators also look over what you post on BlogBourne until a member is white-listed for immediate posting. Moderators let members know if changes need to be made and offer help before a post is approved for posting.
  • On Literacy Base your post must be at least 300 words long. On BlogBourne, it has to be 400 words.
  • Evidently on Literacy Base you can’t save drafts(even though it looks like you should be able to). It’s best to write your post in a word processor and paste it in before submitting. You can save your drafts  in BlogBourne. You can edit and delete posts there, too, but if you delete a post you will lose any coins associated with it. I always advise writing in a word processor first anyway. It gives you a backup copy and protects you if the site goes offline   while you are typing. A screen shot of the BlogBourne editor is below.
Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites
Screen Shot BlogBourne Editor

Notice that you can edit the HTML in the BlogBourne editor (see arrow) and that there are additional fields you can’t see below where the screen shot ends. Now compare with the Literacy Base Editor (below).

Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites
Screen Shot of Literacy Base Editor

You can see that the BlogBourne editor has more options than that of Literacy Base and more closely resembles a WordPress interface. Neither editor has a drop-down menu for header text, but the BlogBourne editor allows you to change the font and text size.

Other Differences between Literacy Base and BlogBourne

  • Navigation is easier on BlogBourne. I discuss this in more detail in Five Reasons Why I Joined BlogBourne. 
  • You may  use an affiliate link in a BlogBourne post, but not in a Literacy Base post. Notice I said a link.
  • Literacy Base only allows links to site sources that support the information in your post.
  • It is easier for people to find your work  on BlogBourne and your profile looks nicer.
  • Literacy Base has a more cluttered design that distracts from reading the posts. Check My Uninvited Guest on Literacy Base and compare it to the link in the first point in this heading from BlogBourne
  • BlogBourne has a very motivating Leaderboard for those of us who are competitive. It lists members by number of coins they’ve earned with highest earners at the top.
  • Literacy Base has been around  since some time in 2014. They opened their Facebook Page in November 2014. BlogBourne launched on August 1,  2016.
  • Literacy Base has annoying  pop-up ads that drive me crazy when I’m trying to read or write posts or participate in groups or forums. So far BlogBourne has only normal  ads.

Will These Sites Survive? Should I Join?

I’m afraid only time will tell that. I don’t mind pioneering a bit. I was one of the first on Bubblews and although I didn’t  expect it to last as long as it did, I made some good money there.  I’m glad I decided to risk it.

I do like social blogging, but I believe BlogJob won’t last much longer.  I haven’t left, but I am moving some posts to my own sites.  BlogBourne and Literacy Base are the most similar sites to BlogJob that I’ve joined.  I happen to prefer BlogBourne, but it doesn’t have as much history yet to evaluate how it will do.  I believe BlogBourne has a more realistic business plan, since it can adjust the value of its coins to fit the income the site produces. You will need to weigh the pros and cons for yourself. You may want to join both.

BlogBourne realized many of its members write English as a second language and that even some who write it as a first language sometimes need help. Administrators write many posts to help these members develop better writing skills so that their posts may be approved faster.

Recently Blogbourne started a buddy system where less proficient  writers can work  with accomplished writers to  improve their work. As a result, the quality of posts on the site has improved and this should help  the site survive.

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?
Read the Terms of Service

My Advice

If you enjoy social blogging and you  have time for two more sites,  join both and try them out. Join before you look around so that if you want to comment on a post, you will earn points or coins for it. If you don’t like the site,  you don’t have to be very active. I joined Literacy Base because I had friends who posted there and I was going to comment anyway. I figured I might as well earn something for it. I joined BlogBourne for much the same reason, but when I got there, I really liked it.

I would suggest you join one or both sites, but don’t write any photo essays that would be hard to move later on. Read the terms of service for each site carefully before joining. They are called FAQ on Literacy Base.

I’ve been around the social blogging block a few times and gotten burned, just like many of you. My sixth sense tells me that I probably should invest more time into BlogBourne than Literacy Base. My common sense tells me I should really invest the most time into my own blogs.

You can sign up with BlogBourne hereYou can join Literacy Base here. These are affiliate links and I will be grateful if you decide to use them.

If you think this post will help someone else who is trying to decide, please share it. The image below is just right for Pinterest.

Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites: Literacy Base and BlogBourne

***

Why It’s Important for Affiliate Marketers to Self-Host WordPress Sites

Do You Want to Blog for Money?

It’s very tempting for affiliate marketers to take advantage of “free” blogging platforms such as BlogJob or revenue sharing sites using a WordPress interface. These platforms have their advantages and many of us have used them with varying results. BlogJob is great if you want to be in a community situation and be able to earn with social activity as well as your blogs. If you are a serious affiliate marketing blogger, who wants control over the monetizing options and how your blog looks, it’s important to self-host your WordPress site. 

Affiliate Marketing Rocks! Giant Coffee Mug
Affiliate Marketing Rocks! Giant Coffee Mug
View more Affiliate marketing Mugs at zazzle.com

Advertising Options

I have six blogs on BlogJob. I wanted to try some different themes that were new to me. I chose the Arcade Basic theme for my blog Trees in My World because I wanted to feature a lot of photos and I liked the large photo header. What I could not predict when writing my posts was what would happen when BlogJob’s placed their Adsense ads on my blog. Here’s what did happen.

Why It's Important to Self-Host Your WordPress Site
BlogJob Placed Ad Covering my Text

As you can see, the ad is covering my text — not something readers will appreciate. It makes me look bad and most readers will just click away, increasing my bounce rate..

I only discovered this was happening again when I was about to promote the page. These ads are pesky because when you are writing your post, you have no idea where they will appear and what form they will take. They don’t show up until someone is actually reading the post. This only has happened when I’ve been using this theme. In all fairness, the administration fixed this for me once, but the site just had a major update and it’s broken again.

When you self-host, you place all the ads. You don’t have to put one in the middle of your post if you don’t want the flow interrupted. You don’t have to worry about ads that will compete for clicks on the products you are linking to yourself. I remember times on revenue sharing sites when I was promoting certain Zazzle products and the same products would also appear in the ads to the right, competing for clicks and commission.

When you self-host, you  don’t have to worry about nasty or questionable ads being placed by your host that you would never approve or want your readers to see. (In all fairness, BlogJob has never placed ads I was ashamed of. ) You have full control in Google’s interface over what ads you do and don’t want to see when you host a site yourself.

Third Party Display Aids

Affiliate marketers want to make their products look attractive on their pages. Some like to use Amazon’s Native Ads. I like to use Easy Product Displays. It’s a very reasonable paid service that lets you easily build attractive displays of affiliate products.

I’m still on the basic plan that lets me search Amazon and Zazzle, my two main affiliate programs. It costs a bit more to include Share-a-Sale. You can choose between several layouts to find the best fit for your page, preview it, and switch products around in the display until you get it just right. Then you copy the code and put it in the text view of your page where you want it.  Here’s an example of a display I just built. (Disclaimer: I chose these books at random because they looked interesting to me.)

 Blogging For Dummies How To Make Money Blogging: How I Replaced My Day Job With My Blog Affiliate Marketing: How to make money and create an income How To Blog For Profit: Without Selling Your Soul Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, Ebooks, Webinars (and More) That Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business

&

There are ways I could adjust this display in the code to make the Amazon buttons line up more evenly, but that isn’t the primary focus of this post. You can display only one product or more than fifteen, if you please, in different sizes or in rows of two, three, and four products. It’s fun to play with it before you get your code.

I cannot use this display in BlogJob because of code conflicts. Amazon Native ads also have to replace one of your Adsense ads at BlogJob. I discovered today I can’t even display the normal text/image ad from Amazon there. I have no control over how the code is written. BlogJob pays the bills and they get to call the shots. They have to make money, too, but if you want control you need to self-host.

Full Control of Affiliate Products Promoted

So far, BlogJob has not limited how many products I may promote per post, only how they are displayed. Revenue sharing sites like HubPages are the most controlling when it comes to this. I hate having robots decide where affiliate links can be placed and how many. Anyone using HubPages will understand what I mean. That is one reason why affiliate marketers are leaving HubPages to self-host. Many who have done that are making much more money after moving their posts to self-hosted sites than they ever did on HubPages.

If You Are Serious about Monetizing, Self-Host

If you are starting from scratch with self-hosted WordPress, I recommend you spend the small amount of money it takes to purchase the course that will show you how to set it up correctly to make money and get traffic. It’s called Set Up a WordPress Site in One Day, and I have purchased it myself.  I thought I knew plenty already, since I had been using self-hosted WordPress for years. After getting this course, I was surprised to learn how much I didn’t know yet.

I recommend you host with SiteGround. I have moved my main site there.  Here’s why.

 

If you want to blog mainly for personal satisfaction or you don’t care if you make money with your blog, go ahead and join BlogJob.  You can still make a bit of money there — probably faster than on HubPages — while enjoying the community aspects of the site and participating in forums. Just keep in mind that if you want to start seriously monetizing a blog to make a business of blogging, you will get much better results if you self-host. 

If you found this post helpful, please share it. The image below was designed for pinning on Pinterest.

Why It's Important for Affiliate Marketers to Self-Host WordPress Sites

 

What Happened to BlogJob?

What is BlogJob?

BlogJob is a social networking community. One can make friends, socialize, and discuss important topics with no minimum number of characters required. These discussions can take place in groups and in forums, as well as on  one’s wall.

Pro and Cons of BlogJob

BlogJob is more user-friendly than Facebook and tsu, though loyal fans of either of those sites will probably stay put even if they also join BlogJob. Facebook still offers groups I would not want to leave because they are important in my writing promotion. And, of course, family members and old friends aren’t likely to leave Facebook either. BlogJob is more of a blog host and networking community for Bloggers.

When I joined Blogjob last year, I thought it was a great place for new bloggers to start. One can write multiple blogs there with a WordPress interface. Bloggers can choose between hundreds of themes and customize them. One can use affiliate links with no problem, as well. There is an interface for putting ads on your blogs to monetize them.

There are some limitations on using third-party interfaces such as Easy Product Display and Amazon Native Ads. They just don’t work because of underlying coding problems. You don’t find out about the missing functions a WordPress user is used to until your site is built and you try to use them.

New bloggers used to be able to earn reward points  that could later be redeemed for gift cards or money in one’s PayPal account for each blog post. Those points combined with those one earned for the networking and commenting one does in the site’s walls, groups, and forums. *

Review of BlogJob.com

One knew that if one went to the trouble to make a 300-word minimum blog post, it wouldn’t be wasted effort because one could get at least a small financial reward. Not only that, because Blogjob is a community, your new blog, even now,  is likely to get visitors, comments, and even some help with promotion on social media if you did a good job.

Unfortunately many decided to put a lot of their writing eggs into the Blogjob basket and cut out some productive work on other sites.

Review of BlgoJob.com
Don’t put all your eggs in one writing basket. © B. Radisavljevic

 

I would not advise putting all your eggs into the Blogjob basket. If you want to be a successful affiliate marketer, this is probably not the host you should use for your main source of livelihood. If blogging for a living is your goal, see Why It’s Important for Affiliate Marketers  to Self-Host WordPress Sites.

I no longer recommend joining BlogJob, even if they open membership again. The site is now in flux and reward points have been “temporarily suspended.” Any money you make will have to come from monetizing your own blogs. As I write this today, I get error messages when I try to read posts my friends have shared — blogs hosted on BlogJob.  Many technical issues will have to be sorted out before the site is reliable again for blogging and promotion.

It appears many people are being patient, hoping the site will once again be what it was or better. I’m not holding my breath. Yes, I hope the site will solve its problems and recover, since it was important source of income for many who were close to  a payment threshold.

The administration said it will be paying those who have earned the required number of points. Some report they received their payments. Most are convinced the administration is honest and appreciate his telling them upfront what is happening. I tend to agree that he’s doing what he can to solve the problems . The question is still whether that will be enough and whether the site will generate enough  to bring advertisers back. 

Important Updates

*Update May 5, 2016As of May 4, 2016, the rewards system has been “temporarily suspended.” Members can continue to blog and interact, but will not be earning any more points until the site owner manages to fix some problems on the site. Members should still be able to redeem points earned if they have enough to qualify for redemption. Many voices in the forums say they will leave their work there and carry on as usual. Some are taking a wait and see attitude. Some are leaving. Membership is closed again.

The administration says the site migration to a new server killed traffic and he is trying to test various plugins to see if they are having an adverse effect on traffic and resources. He is hoping to get things, fixed, restore traffic to produce income, and start giving points again some time when all this is settled.

Update May 3, 2016: There is an application process in place now, and there is no guarantee of acceptance. Be aware that some people who have been accepted have received emails within 24 hours that their memberships have been declined.

An unwritten policy seems to be that you need to fill out a complete profile, including the bio part at the bottom of the edit profile page, right away and start a site or post to forums to let the administration know you are serious about adding content. If you have written for other sites with a good reputation, be sure to include that in your profile and link to any blog you might currently have elsewhere as your website. They want to know you are a writer, not just someone who wants to earn points by collecting friends and joining groups without adding valuable content to the site.