Tag Archives: online writing income

Review: Will These Social Blogging Sites Survive?

A Selective History of Social Blogging Sites

The first social blogging site I joined was Bubblews. It lasted for almost three years. It was very popular and established writers from well-known sites like HubPages devoted less time to writing for them because they were making more on Bubblews. This left HubPages weaker, and many people, including me, found it hard to just jump back in at HubPages after Bubblews stopped paying.

Social blogging was easy, fun, and struck a chord for those of us who wanted to connect as people rather than just share information. Since the fall of Bubblews, people began looking for another social blogging site. Many went back to myLot, which had changed ownership and gone back to paying members. It is a simple forum, but its new format also makes it ideal for social blogging.  This got friends connected again, but social bloggers wanted something a bit different.

Many of those looking discovered BlogJob. BlogJob seemed to combine the best features of Bubblews and myLot. I have reviewed the state of BlogJob in Transition here.  Some people are still hanging on, but few are very active anymore. Once again the search is on for a new site. This week I’ve joined two new sites very similar to BlogJob.

Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites
Photo in Public Domain Courtesy of Pixabay.com

UPDATE, November 30, 2017

I was able to log into BlogBourne, but it’s obvious that it’s on its way out. It might as well be gone. I also checked into my account at Literacy Base.  I think it’s on its last legs, as well.  If you aren’t already a member of these sites, I recommend you not join them. If you are, it’s time to back up any work you have left on them and save it.

UPDATE, July 15, 2017

Blogbourne will be closing when its hosting expires in October, 2017. Literacy Base has improved since I first posted this review.  Keep that in mind when you read the rest of this post.

Literacy Base and BlogBourne — What They Have in Common

  • They are both a lot like BlogJob. They offer free hosting for social bloggers and they provide groups and forums for member interaction outside the blogs. Unlike BlogJob, though, one cannot have an independent WordPress Blog on either site such as BlogJob members have.
  • They are owned or administrated by people whose first language is not English. This means some of the site documentation has errors in standard English.
  • They both offer some form of compensation to those active on the sites
  • Both will pay members through PayPal. Literacy Base also  pays through Payoneer.
  • Both provide members with referral links to share their articles and to recruit new members.
  • Both sites are currently experiencing growing pains and may go offline from time to time as they work out bugs. BlogBourne officially launched August 1, 2016.

How Literacy Base and BlogBourne Differ: Payment

Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites
Photo in Public Domain Courtesy of Pixabay.com
  • BlogBourne splits site earnings with members, keeping 50% for site expenses and dividing the rest to to determine the value of a coin. This system is similar to the one Persona Paper was using. Literacy Base pays specific cash amounts for specific tasks like commenting or writing posts. The value of a BlogBourne coin fluctuates and is posted every month.
  • BlogBourne will be paying seven days after a person orders payment, but the payments won’t be issued the first time until two months after the site’s launch. BlogBourne payment amounts range from $5 to $100.  Literacy Base pays on  the tenth day of the month after a person has earned $10.
  • BlogBourne currently offers the same amount of coins for any post. Literacy Base at its own discretion pays more for higher quality interactions and longer posts.
  • Literacy Base currently has placed no limits on how much a member can earn in a day.  BlogBourne has a limit of three posts per day and varying limits for other activities one can earn for.

How Literacy Base and BlogBourne Differ: Editors and Posting

  • On Literacy Base your blog post has to be approved before it will post. That can take up to 24 hours. If more people become active, that might increase the approval time. Moderators also look over what you post on BlogBourne until a member is white-listed for immediate posting. Moderators let members know if changes need to be made and offer help before a post is approved for posting.
  • On Literacy Base your post must be at least 300 words long. On BlogBourne, it has to be 400 words.
  • Evidently on Literacy Base you can’t save drafts(even though it looks like you should be able to). It’s best to write your post in a word processor and paste it in before submitting. You can save your drafts in BlogBourne. You can edit and delete posts there, too, but if you delete a post you will lose any coins associated with it. I always advise writing in a word processor first anyway. It gives you a backup copy and protects you if the site goes offline while you are typing. A screen shot of the BlogBourne editor is below.
Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites
Screen Shot BlogBourne Editor

Notice that you can edit the HTML in the BlogBourne editor (see arrow) and that there are additional fields you can’t see below where the screen shot ends. Now compare with the Literacy Base Editor (below).

Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites
Screen Shot of Literacy Base Editor

You can see that the BlogBourne editor has more options than that of Literacy Base and more closely resembles a WordPress interface. Neither editor has a drop-down menu for header text, but the BlogBourne editor allows you to change the font and text size.

Other Differences between Literacy Base and BlogBourne

  • You may use an affiliate link in a BlogBourne post, but not in a Literacy Base post. Notice I said a link.
  • Literacy Base only allows links to site sources that support the information in your post.
  • It is easier for people to find your work on BlogBourne and your profile looks nicer.
  • Literacy Base has a more cluttered design that distracts from reading the posts.
  • BlogBourne has a very motivating Leaderboard for those of us who are competitive. It lists members by number of coins they’ve earned with highest earners at the top.
  • Literacy Base has been around since some time in 2014. They opened their Facebook Page in November 2014. BlogBourne launched on August 1,  2016.
  • Literacy Base has made improvements in their site. Blogbourne will be closing in October, 2017.

Will These Sites Survive? Should I Join?

I’m afraid only time will tell that. I don’t mind pioneering a bit. I was one of the first on Bubblews and although I didn’t  expect it to last as long as it did, I made some good money there.  I’m glad I decided to risk it.

I do like social blogging, but I believe BlogJob won’t last much longer.  I haven’t left, but I am moving some posts to my own sites.  BlogBourne and Literacy Base are the most similar sites to BlogJob that I’ve joined.  I happen to prefer BlogBourne, but it has already announced it is closing.  You will need to weigh the pros and cons for yourself.

 

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?
Read the Terms of Service

My Advice: Updated November 30, 2017

If you haven’t joined yet, I don’t advise you to. I don’t expect either site to last long enough to pay you.

I’ve been around the social blogging block a few times and gotten burned, just like many of you. My common sense tells me I should really invest the most time into my own blogs. If you do not yet have your own blog, now is the time to start one. Here’s how.

If you think this post will help someone else who is trying to decide, please share it. The image below is just right for Pinterest.

Review: Two New Social Blogging Sites: Literacy Base and BlogBourne

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Now’s the Time to Buy the Best Affiliate Marketing Course Ever

Get Your Pajama Affiliate Marketing Blogging Course Now!

Many of us struggle for years on blogs that don’t make any money from affiliate marketing. We put in our links, but they don’t convert to sales. We wonder why. That was me. I was working hard, but not smart.

Then I heard about the Pajama Affiliate blogging classes. I had read lots of blogs on blogging and affiliate marketing,  but they didn’t help. My friends started raving about the Pajama Affiliates, so I first bought the Amazon Masterclass they were so excited about.

Now's the Time to Buy the Best Affiliate Marketing Course Ever
Click image for current price.

 

I was so happy with it that I bought the Pajama Affiliates Beginning Blogger and Affiliate Marketing Course.  This is a great introduction to the Pajama Affiliate Marketing Courses. It is often on sale. Just click to check current price. 

These video courses are very practical. You learn about finding the right niche, the right keywords, and the best way to make your blog  friendly to search engines. You also learn how to use your affiliate links in ways that will convert to sales. You can find the details of what’s covered in each course here.  There’s even the option of a free sample that lets you get a feel for the courses before you buy them.

The Affiliate Marketing and Amazon Masterclass is also on sale for a limited time.  You might want to pick up this class now, since it was upgraded in mid-October and then the price may double any day. Those who already have the course get the updates grandfathered in. All sales prices are limited time offers. Meanwhile, if you click the links above, the current prices will be accurate for the time you are there.  There usually is a sale on one or more classes going on. 

Now's the Time to Buy the Best Blogging Course Ever

 

Here’s What’s in the Business Bundle

This course tells you all you need to know in order to start your own self-hosted WordPress blogging business.

Here’s what you get in the Business Bundle: 

  1. Beginners Blogging and Affiliate Marketing Course
  2. Blogging and Affiliate Marketing Masterclass
  3. Find Your Profitable Niche
  4. Build a WordPress Site in a Day
  5. Buyer Keywords Bonus
  6. How to Write a Blog Post that Converts Sales

I bought all these courses separately unless they were included in one of the first two courses. These courses have completely turned my blogging life around. Here’s why I think I got the value I paid for from the Pajama Affiliate Courses.

These courses are about much more than blogging. They teach you how to find your blogging niche, how to organize your blogs, how to write blogs that reach and motivate people who are ready to buy your products. You learn how to offer your readers what they are looking for,  and if you do that correctly, your posts will start getting sales. If you don’t take any other course, take “How to Write a Blog Post that Converts Sales.”  It has completely transformed my approach to blogging.

 

Success Depends Upon Applying What You Learn

 

Now's the Time to Buy the Best Blogging Course Ever
Click image to check out all courses.

Of course, all the courses in the world won’t improve your sales unless you watch the videos,  read the notes,  and apply what you learn. But after six years of blogging without this course, I never got a payment from Amazon. I bought the course at the end of December and got my first check from the Amazon affiliate program at the end of the next January. I’m about ready for another one.  My Zazzle sales are also improving since I also promote my Zazzle products in my blogs.

I’m not yet making the kind of money Robin and Lesley are making. It takes time to start making hundreds or thousands of dollars a year. I need to redo most of my already published blogs and also write new ones applying what Robin and Lesley have taught me. I expect, though, that by the end of this year I will have earned back all I’ve paid for the course, pro versions of apps that help me, and website expenses for new blogs and renewals of old ones and still have more to buy services I need for my home.

It does take money to make money sometimes. One just needs to spend it wisely. If you buy a Pajama Affiliates blogging course, you will be spending it wisely. Just hurry so you don’t miss current sale prices  Tomorrow may be too late. My income increases more every day as I apply what I’ve learned and am still learning.

Now's the Time to Buy the Best Blogging Course Ever. Buy now while the prices is low.

 

 

Four Things You Need to Do After a Writing Site Closes

Writing Sites Sometimes Close With No Warning

 

Four Things You Need to Do After a Writing Site ClosesIt seems almost every few months another writing site closes.  During the past three years Squidoo, Bubblews, Zujava, Wikinut, Seekyt, and sites I never even joined have closed or stopped paying.

When Persona Paper gave notice they would close, the site administrators, who have always been upfront with us, gave us fair warning so that we would have time to save our work. As it turned out, a new owner took over Persona Paper, but it’s no longer paying.  Not very many people are still active there.  Many of us have already backed up our work — just in case.

Besides Persona Paper, I belong to other sites which may or may not be around a year from now. The owners of Blogborne and Niume seem to have lost interest in them and activity has decreased. As income on these third party sites goes down, more and more people are moving work to their own sites.

Checklist for Exiting a Writing Site

  1. Make copies of your work
  2. Delete links to your work
  3. Edit your social media automated feeds
  4. Invest more in your self-hosted sites

Make Copies of Your Work

If you’ve been through a sudden site closure with no warning before, you probably already know you should be making backups for every single post or article you write. When Bubblews closed, many were caught off-guard and lost their work.

There’s another lesson I learned at Bubblews, though. A site can also make a site-wide change that will butcher what you have written. This happened during an update where Bubblews stripped most of the content from many posts that had used multiple images. I lost many photo essays, even though I had drafts of the text.

Four Things You Need to Do After a Writing Site ClosesFrom now on, I plan to save every post with multiple images as a complete web page through my browser. In Chrome this is really easy. Just go to the dots in the top right corner. Click. Choose “More Tools” from the drop-down menu that appears. When you mouse over it, you can click “Save page as.” A window will appear to allow you to choose a file to save to. Choose and save. Wait for the download and you’re finished.  What a simple way to have a model of your page exactly as it appeared when published so you can reconstruct it later.

Delete Links to Your Work

This is the part that is not fun. If you’ve been writing very long, you have probably been crosslinking articles you’ve written on different sites. When Squidoo closed I had lots of links going to my lenses from my blogs and from my Hubs on HubPages and from articles on other sites. Fortunately, many of those links forwarded to HubPages for pages that had been transferred, but I didn’t allow all my articles to transfer.

I have 350 articles on Persona Paper, and a good portion of those are articles I tweeted recently. I have linked to them from blogs. I have pinned them on Pinterest and shared them on Google + and Facebook. I  have linked to them from content websites I own. If Persona Paper goes away for good, those will all be dead links. I will have to remove them. Maybe you also have some link cleaning to do if you have backlinks to work on closed or closing sites.

Edit Your Social Media Feeds

Many people have automated collections of tweets and Facebook posts which they set up ahead of time for a couple of hundred evergreen posts in a service like Hootsuite. They just keep being posted over time until you change them. If links to posts or sites no longer functioning are being tweeted, you will lose credibility.

Invest in More in Your Self-Hosted Sites

Sometimes I feel like I’m on a merry-go-round. Gather closes so I post an old Gather post to Bubblews. Bubblews closes so I republish that same post to Persona Paper. Persona Paper closes… Then what?

Four Things You Need to Do After a Writing Site Closes
Are You on the Content Writing Merry-Go-Round? Courtesy of Pixabay

People are still trying to find new homes for their old Squidoo lenses and hubs that aren’t doing well. Many are starting their own blogs or spending more time creating or republishing content to blogs or sites they already own. I wrote recently about how to move writing from content sites to your own site.

If you’ve been stuck on the content writing site merry-go-round, maybe it’s time to get off and invest in your own self-hosted sites. If your sites are already set up, invest more time in updating them and adding new content. Many who have moved posts from HubPages to their own sites are seeing increased earnings from them now. Check out the great hosting deals for WordPress sites at SiteGround. They are very helpful there.

If you don’t yet have your own blog, join Pajama Affiliates so you can learn to set up a self-hosted WordPress site correctly from the beginning.  It’s a small investment up front, but most get it back in earnings if they apply what they learn there.  I have found it valuable for myself.

My Pajama Affiliate Courses are Worth Every Penny I Paid for Them. The teachers are making thousands a year in affiliate income without being spammy.  They can teach you to monetize your own blogs in a reputable way. The courses go on sale often. While you’re waiting for a sale, you can clean out your dead links in cyberspace.

Hope this post helps you set goals that don’t depend on a third party site to help you earn. Be adventurous. Step out on your own. Take control of your own destiny in cyberspace. I think you will enjoy creating and looking back on your accomplishments.

Make Money from Your Blog

Are You Still Waiting to Make Money from Your Blog?

Do you want to learn how to monetize your blog or website?  Adsense may be putting ads on your sites, but you may only make a penny every two weeks or so from those ads. You don’t make much from Google unless you have thousands of people visiting your site every day. I’m not there yet. Are you?

I Finally Got Serious about my Blogging Business

I  just started my serious blogging journey in December. Until last year I relied on content sites like Squidoo (now defunct), HubPages, and Bubblews (also now defunct) to make my writing pay off. I never made much from affiliate sales and I like to think it’s because I didn’t try very hard. I’d like to turn my blogs into cash cows.

Make Money from Your Blog
I’d Like to Make My Blogs Cash Cows.

 

I currently belong to two direct affiliate programsAmazon and Zazzle. So far Zazzle has done better for me. If you aren’t a member of their affiliate program, you should join. It’s free and Zazzle products are easy to promote on a blog since they have products to relate to anything you can think of to write about. Here’s how to get started with Zazzle. There are many Zazzle support groups on Facebook to help once you get started.

Spend a Bit of Money to Make a Lot of Money

I have now connected with a group of other former Squidoo writers who used to make a lot of money with affiliate marketing on Squidoo. They now are making it with affiliate sales on their own blogs.  Some make thousands of dollars a month.

Two of them have put together a course that teaches anyone how to do what they have done, as long as they can communicate well in writing and are willing to work hard.  I thought I couldn’t afford it.

Finally, I decided I would take the plunge anyway as an investment in my future, and at the end of December 2015, I bought my first course. Participating showed me how much I could learn from Leslie (who just bought her first home with her affiliate earnings) and Robin.  I signed up for even more courses.

Here’s the Scoop on Pajama Affiliate Marketing Courses

For a complete description of the courses, you can save time by going directly to the  Pajama Affiliate Home Page. The complete Pajama Affiliate Marketing course includes more than the Amazon Associates Master Class I describe below. I have known the people who put these courses together for a long time on Squidoo.  I know that taking courses is not a magic pill that will transform your blog overnight,  but if you put the work in, you will begin to make more money with your blog if you work smart. I decided it was time for me to learn to work smart.

The price for the courses fluctuates as they go on sale for limited times and then go up again. I’m excited about the all-in-one blogging bundle that was introduced on February 18, 2016. It shows you everything you need to know about blogging. It will teach you how to make money from your blog. Check it out.

All Pajama Affiliate courses are reasonably priced for what they offer, but they often go on sale. The best way to find out immediately about any sales is to take advantage of the free Fastpass described at the end of this post. It gives you access to the private Facebook group where sale announcements are first made.

Make Money from Your Blog  My first course was the Pajama Affiliates Amazon Associates Master Class.   When you click the link you will land on a page that describes all you will learn along with the current price. It’s quite likely it will be a sale price. This course is part of the all new blogging bundle described above.

The courses include videos with written summaries of what the videos cover. That makes it easy for me to recap what I’ve heard without listening again. I’ve only had time to watch a few videos since I signed up, but already I’m learning a lot I never knew about how to do the things I knew I should be doing.

  •  finding keywords
  • knowing where to put them
  • putting content and images together for the best selling results
  • adding products and affiliate links to my pages effectively
  • SEO
  • using the different social media most effectively to bring in traffic
  • much, much more

Make Money from Your Blog

Learn to Make Your Blog Profitable

 

Support in Your Blogging Journey Helps

One reason I signed up is because many of my friends from Squidoo days are also taking the course and they say it has really helped them increase their affiliate income. Keep in mind that these ladies have been doing serious affiliate selling for much longer than I, and they say they are learning way more than they ever knew before about how to make their writing time pay off.

If you purchase this course, you also have lifelong access to Leslie’s coaching. Getting the information about the course costs nothing. I had saved the little bit left in my PayPal account after Bubblews closed, and I decided I would spend what it took to learn how to make real money — not just a few dollars a month — from my websites.

The Pajama Affiliates have two Facebook groups for help and support where members can work together to make each other more successful. The groups have challenges. Members help promote each other. Those who have purchased any course have access to the groups.

Make Money from Your Blog
Support Groups Give Helpful Tips and Honest Feedback

Other Affiliate Programs You Can Join

Zazzle and Amazon aren’t the only affiliate programs you can join. There are also those that are under the umbrella of a network such as Skimlinks, ShareASale, or CJ Affiliate (formerly Commission Junction.)  I am currently enrolled in the first two, and I’m  beginning to see some earnings accumulating in my Skimlinks account. I’m not ready to give up on ShareASale yet, because I’ve not worked hard enough at it. I don’t like CJ Affiliates terms because they deactivate your account if you don’t make a sale in a ninety-day period. Mine is currently deactivated. Skimlinks and ShareASale are more reasonable and I do know people who are making money with them. I will concentrate on Zazzle and Amazon until I’m happy with my results and then I will probably tackle ShareaSale with more enthusiasm.

I don’t like CJ Affiliates’ terms because they deactivate your account if you don’t make a sale in a ninety-day period. Mine is currently deactivated. Skimlinks and ShareASale are more reasonable and I do know people who are making money with them. I will concentrate on Zazzle and Amazon until I’m happy with my results and then I will probably tackle ShareaSale with more enthusiasm.

Skimlinks is a good alternative for those who cannot become Amazon affiliates directly because of tax laws in their states. If you use Skimlinks you don’t have to be approved by the individual merchants in their programs because you are sending your referral links with their referral codes through the Skimlinks account and Skimlinks pays you directly when your commissions add up to $10. They take a cut, but they also have a much lower payment threshold than the individual sites.

Zazzle and ShareASale pay when you have $50, and Amazon requires $10 for payout unless you want a check, for which you need $100. If you use ShareASale, you need to be accepted into each of their individual merchant programs. Since merchant programs and deals can come and go, it can be hard to keep track of them.

What Results Can a New Pajama Affiliate Expect?

 

I’m convinced if my friends,  people I know are telling the truth, are making some real money with their blogs,  I can do the same thing. I will have to change my blogging habits to do more than working by instinct and writing just what’s easy for me.  I will have to work smart and put the time in to plan my blogs as money makers and then execute those plans. It will take discipline, but I’m going to make money from my blogs.

I bought my first course at the end of December 2015, and have not yet had time to complete it. I apply what I learn as I learn it in every new post I write. In all of 2015 I had earned only 52.08 in affiliate income and all of it was from Zazzle.

This year, from January 1 to May 1, I have earned 61.24 from Zazzle (more than I earned all last year) and $11.28 from Amazon, when I’d never gotten a payment from them before. I can see my earnings increasing. As I have time to complete the courses and apply more of what I am learning, I know these earnings will increase. The income from my remaining third party site, HubPages, brought in only $25.10 during this same period, as the total earnings for both my accounts there.  Amazon earnings alone beat those totals this year. And I know they will grow.

December 2016 Update

If I count what I made on my blogs from Google Adsense and affiliate sales, my income from blogging doubled in 2016 over 2015.  If I leave out Goggle, my affiliate income alone tripled over 2015.  I realize that’s no fortune. But most of the year I was still learning and practicing new techniques.  As of the end of June this year Amazon had paid me $21.65. My December Amazon sales as of today, December 22, are 29.14 since my last payment in June. I had not received any Amazon payments in 2014 or 2015.

Earning are going up, and I’m getting the hang of how to make this work. I think by this time next year I will see a geometric progression in sales. I will have to work harder this year to make money from my blogs and not spend so much time writing for content sites that distract me and don’t pay well.

What Will You Do to Improve Your Earnings?

How about you? Will you invest a bit of cash into making your blogging more profitable and then make 2016 the year you will reap your reward? Just click this link for information about the new all-in-one Affiliate Marketing Classes Business Bundle.  Start learning to make money from your blog today. 

 

If this post helped you, please pass it on. The image below was designed especially for Pinterest sharing.

Make Money from Your Blog

 

 

 

 

The Bubblews Bubble Has Finally Burst

Soap Bubbles, CCO, public domain.
Soap Bubbles, CCO, public domain.

After three years, Bubblews has shut down. A visit to the site shows  only a brief announcement that Bubblews  can no longer stay in business with  what they earn from the ads they  show.  I’m not surprised. I expected it. That’s  why I haven’t wasted any more time there since the beginning of the year.

If you  wrote on Bubblews and don’t know how to find your Bubblews friends, I suggest you go to myLot. Many people found their way to Bubblews when  the old version of myLot stopped  paying. Most of them have returned since it came  back under the original ownership and started paying again. I noticed many new people there  from Bubblews today. Connect with me at myLot and you’ll find most of the old timers among my friends. Just click on their profiles to  follow them and get acquainted fast.

MyLot pays a few pennies a day  just for interacting with  other myLotters in the discussions that interest you. You can also  start your own discussions. It’s an easy site to visit and relax with friends while  watching your pennies add up. For more information on using myLot, be sure to read the blog post by @owlwings,  one of the most knowledgeable members. You will   also want to  follow him.

How do you feel about the demise of Bubblews? I think I’m relieved that I no longer have to worry about deleting my posts one my  one. I lost almost  $20 in unpaid earnings, but many lost more than I did. Now I’m wondering which will be the next site to close.

I just revised my Hub that Reviews Bubblews to reflect on what we can learn from what happened there: What Can We Learn from the Fall of Bubblews?

What Happened to BlogJob?

What is BlogJob?

BlogJob is a social networking community. One can make friends, socialize, and discuss important topics with no minimum number of characters required. These discussions can take place in groups and in forums, as well as on  one’s wall.

Pro and Cons of BlogJob

BlogJob is more user-friendly than Facebook and tsu, though loyal fans of either of those sites will probably stay put even if they also join BlogJob. Facebook still offers groups I would not want to leave because they are important in my writing promotion. And, of course, family members and old friends aren’t likely to leave Facebook either. BlogJob is more of a blog host and networking community for Bloggers.

When I joined Blogjob last year, I thought it was a great place for new bloggers to start. One can write multiple blogs there with a WordPress interface. Bloggers can choose between hundreds of themes and customize them. One can use affiliate links with no problem, as well. There is an interface for putting ads on your blogs to monetize them.

There are some limitations on using third-party interfaces such as Easy Product Display and Amazon Native Ads. They just don’t work because of underlying coding problems. You don’t find out about the missing functions a WordPress user is used to until your site is built and you try to use them.

New bloggers used to be able to earn reward points  that could later be redeemed for gift cards or money in one’s PayPal account for each blog post. Those points combined with those one earned for the networking and commenting one does in the site’s walls, groups, and forums. *

Review of BlogJob.com

One knew that if one went to the trouble to make a 300-word minimum blog post, it wouldn’t be wasted effort because one could get at least a small financial reward. Not only that, because Blogjob is a community, your new blog, even now,  is likely to get visitors, comments, and even some help with promotion on social media if you did a good job.

Unfortunately many decided to put a lot of their writing eggs into the Blogjob basket and cut out some productive work on other sites.

Review of BlgoJob.com
Don’t put all your eggs in one writing basket. © B. Radisavljevic

 

I would not advise putting all your eggs into the Blogjob basket. If you want to be a successful affiliate marketer, this is probably not the host you should use for your main source of livelihood. If blogging for a living is your goal, see Why It’s Important for Affiliate Marketers  to Self-Host WordPress Sites.

I no longer recommend joining BlogJob, even if they open membership again. The site is now in flux and reward points have been “temporarily suspended.” Any money you make will have to come from monetizing your own blogs. As I write this today, I get error messages when I try to read posts my friends have shared — blogs hosted on BlogJob.  Many technical issues will have to be sorted out before the site is reliable again for blogging and promotion.

It appears many people are being patient, hoping the site will once again be what it was or better. I’m not holding my breath. Yes, I hope the site will solve its problems and recover, since it was important source of income for many who were close to  a payment threshold.

The administration said it will be paying those who have earned the required number of points. Some report they received their payments. Most are convinced the administration is honest and appreciate his telling them upfront what is happening. I tend to agree that he’s doing what he can to solve the problems . The question is still whether that will be enough and whether the site will generate enough  to bring advertisers back. 

Important Updates

*Update May 5, 2016As of May 4, 2016, the rewards system has been “temporarily suspended.” Members can continue to blog and interact, but will not be earning any more points until the site owner manages to fix some problems on the site. Members should still be able to redeem points earned if they have enough to qualify for redemption. Many voices in the forums say they will leave their work there and carry on as usual. Some are taking a wait and see attitude. Some are leaving. Membership is closed again.

The administration says the site migration to a new server killed traffic and he is trying to test various plugins to see if they are having an adverse effect on traffic and resources. He is hoping to get things, fixed, restore traffic to produce income, and start giving points again some time when all this is settled.

Update May 3, 2016: There is an application process in place now, and there is no guarantee of acceptance. Be aware that some people who have been accepted have received emails within 24 hours that their memberships have been declined.

An unwritten policy seems to be that you need to fill out a complete profile, including the bio part at the bottom of the edit profile page, right away and start a site or post to forums to let the administration know you are serious about adding content. If you have written for other sites with a good reputation, be sure to include that in your profile and link to any blog you might currently have elsewhere as your website. They want to know you are a writer, not just someone who wants to earn points by collecting friends and joining groups without adding valuable content to the site.

 

Review Comparing Bubblews, Tsu, and myLot

MyLot Back in the Game

The online writing community is abuzz with conversation about the return of myLot with its former owners in charge again as a revenue sharing site. Back in 2013, myLot was a vibrant community that had a forum to discuss anything and everything that was on members’ minds, as long as it was G-rated. People made friends. People recruited friends. People earned a bit of money as they got to know each other. I found out about myLot through online friends.

Then, in the first part of 2013, myLot’s ownership changed hands and stopped sharing revenues. They also changed the way the forum looked, and changed the rules to allow the sharing of links from which members could profit, and the site became spammy. Some people continued to be active, but many people left or stopped using the site, hoping that the site might someday become what it had been once again.

The Brief Era of Bubblews in Social Blogging

Them, seemingly out of nowhere, Bubblews emerged, inviting people to write their worlds. It sounded wonderful. Arvind Dixit said that the people who created the content, the little people, should profit from their work, and that he would share the ad revenues with those who accepted the invitation to “share your world” in posts of only 400 characters.

Bubblews became known as a social blogging site. People were paid a penny each for the views, comments, and likes they got on their posts – a rate that far exceeded what those who wrote for Squidoo, HubPages, and many other revenue sharing sites paid their members. Word spreads fast. Everyone said no one could afford to keep paying those rates, but many decided to concentrate their efforts on Bubblews for the easy money while it lasted. This is especially true of those who felt homeless after what happened to myLot and Gather, another site which had suddenly closed. People swarmed from myLot to Bubblews and were delighted with the pay rate.

Review Comparing Bubblews, Tsu, and myLot

 

Then, at the end of 2014, Bubblews announced they were not going to pay their writers what they were owed. Some simply were denied payments they had earned and submitted for redemption before a certain date in November. Bubblews administrators announced they were out of money and could no longer pay the same rates. No announcement was made on how pay rates would be determined. Many people just quit. Bubblews closed its site before the end of 2015.

 

Tsu Emerged as a New Social Network

Then, suddenly, tsu made its debut. I never made money there and found it a bit too busy for me. Many were very happy there, but many also left because it wasn’t a good fit. I got less and less active there because I found it overwhelming. In August, 2016, the site went dark, and its founder stated that those who had reached the payment threshold of $100 could email him, and he would pay them.

The Return to MyLot

 

At myLot There is Always Someone to Talk To
There’s no excuse for being lonely at myLot.

Now myLot is back in the hands of the original owners and the site is sharing revenues again. Not only are former members who had migrated to Bubblews returning, but they are bringing new friends they were close to on Bubblews with them. They are bringing people who used to write for Squidoo and who still write for HubPages. The result will be a more diverse membership that in the past.

So how do Bubblews, tsu and myLot compare now? MyLot is the only one of the sites that has survived.

Review Comparing Bubblews, Tsu, and myLot

 

MyLot is full of people excited to be back. They are earning their daily few cents again, and they are happy that they can cash out after earning only $5 as opposed to the $50 on Bubblews or $100 on tsu. Some of the old perks people had to earn (like being able to copy and paste and use emoticons) are now available to all as soon as they join. The old star system that made some people earn more than others is now gone and everyone is equal. One earns with all activity – posting and getting interaction on a post, and commenting on the posts and responses of others.

This is unique in the online world. On myLot people get paid for all their interaction on a post, and this encourages the long discussions that myLotters love. There is no set length a comment has to be, so people don’t say anymore than they need to in order to make a point.

MyLot requires members to write in English. It does not, however require that the English is proficient and many posts and comments can be hard to understand for that reason. It’s a great place for those studying English who want to practice.  You can join myLot here to party with us. MyLot does not currently have a referral program.

 

Review Comparing Bubblews, Tsu, and MyLot over the Long Haul

 

Should You Start a Blog?

Advice to Those Who Want to Start a Blog

 

Do you want to start a blog?  I recently read a post by Angie Tolpin, You Don’t Have to Be a Blogger to Be My Friend. That got me thinking about my own blogging experiences, and what advice  I might give someone today who likes to write and may want to start a blog.  Angie’s readers seem to be mostly mothers with children still at home. I am past that. There was no internet for me back in those days, or I might have jumped on the blogging bandwagon then, too.

Should You Start a Blog?
Letter from a Swedish Pen Pal in My College Days

I had always wanted to write, and I satisfied that urge with a journal and by writing to penpals in various parts of the world. That continued through my college days.

After I got married and began to be active in churches as an adult, we led the college group and what I had to say was usually specific to certain friends who had shared their problems with me. So I wrote letters of encouragement, especially to those who were away at college. I also wrote letters to some of my high school students who had graduated and joined the service. There was no shortage of ways to communicate in writing. In the days before social networks, people did actually use snail mail.

What Made Me Finally Start a Blog?

After my 14-year-old son died in 1991, I started a book business for which I did a lot of traveling. It kept me too busy to take on anything else. But after we stopped traveling and I took the business online, I heard that people in business should start a blog. So I did. I wasn’t really passionate about it, and coming up with ideas was hard. It probably wasn’t a good idea to start a blog then, now that I look back. I don’t post to it much anymore because it’s not self-hosted and I can’t monetize it. I don’t have the book business anymore, either.

I had one other blog I started in 2006 that still continues to this day — my gardening blog. It is a more satisfactory way to keep a photo history of my garden to refer back to than the written journals I had kept earlier. I was passionate about gardening, and only one thing kept me from my blog in those days — too much else to do in the garden itself, and the squirrels. After the attacks in which the squirrels destroyed my garden I had little to write on that blog anymore, so I changed the focus.

Something else kept me from the gardening blog for over a year. That something was a new and very profitable writing site, called Bubblews, which was great while it lasted. I started posting my gardening journals there instead of to my blog because I earned more from them there and had more readers.

But one dark day last year Bubblews finally went down, as many of us were sure it would.  I have gone back to my blog to publish my garden journal — when I have time. I couldn’t work in the garden for almost a year because I’d had two surgeries, but I’m now posting again on Barb’s Garden Observations.  The lesson I learned was that if a blog is really important to you, host it yourself and keep it on your own site. My newer blogs are all self-hosted. 

Social Blogging on Medium: A Path to Starting Your Own Blog

Social blogging didn’t exist when I started my first blogs. As far as I know, Bubblews was the first social blogging network. I now use Medium for social blogging. Here’s my Medium profile so you can get a feel for it. I just joined because I heard it was a great promotion tool. I’m not sure it is, but it will help you start writing online if you are new to it. You will make new writing friends. Medium will expose you to new ideas. It is also easy to interact with others there.

I would advise anyone thinking about starting a blog who does not yet have a focus, to join Medium and start social blogging. Why? Because it is a good way to get your feet wet and develop a focus. It’s like test blogging to see if it suits you. You can make contacts for when you start your own blog. You will also communicate with people who don’t necessarily share your values and beliefs.

Learn How to Earn Money on Your Blog

Most bloggers, myself included, begin blogging without a clear plan on how to make it earn for them. If you haven’t started your blog yet, I would recommend you learn how to do it correctly from the beginning. Learn from experienced bloggers who have mastered making their blogs pay off and have the payment proofs to support their claims.

Should You Start a Blog?Recently many of my old friends from Squidoo started talking about how much they were learning in the Pajama Affiliates blogging courses and how their incomes had increased because of it. Since most of those people had made a lot more affiliate income on Squidoo than I ever had, I was impressed. I already knew of the teachers of the course because they had also written on Squidoo with me.

I had known part of what they did to make their money and be successful at affiliate selling, but I never knew how to do it myself. To tell the truth, part of me resisted having to do affiliate sales to support my content writing. But now that those content writing sites where I made my income are gone or paying peanuts.  I need to make the income to cover my blogging expenses and buy some of the extras I want. The blogging course my friends were taking went on sale and I had enough in PayPal to cover it so I signed up.

Instruction is given by video and written summaries. There is a private Facebook group for all those taking the course to ask questions and get help. The group members also visit and help promote each other’s blogs. That in itself is worth what I paid. I’m already learning steps I can take right now to increase the effectiveness of my blogs.

Best of all, Leslie, who teaches the class, is showing me that I don’t have to write spammy blogs to make money. Her blogs offer a lot of information, cleverly presented,  and almost sneak the product links in. The course is often on sale. The best deal is the new all-in-one blogging bundle that has everything you need to know about blogging.  I just signed up for another one myself. 

  Leslie is making thousands of dollars from her blog a month, and I’m lucky to make a hundred a year the way I’ve been doing it. Should You Start a Blog?I just signed up for two more courses, Social Media Marketing and Buyer Keywords and I’m glad I did. These are included in the new course. Find the details and current price for the Affiliate Marketing and Business Bundle here.  You will often find courses on sale.  

 Blogging on Medium

Medium is probably the easiest place to try out blogging.  Follow the link, sign up for free, and start reading what others have written. Search by tag to find posts that may interest you. Follow the people who write posts you like. Highlight parts of those posts that speak to you. Comment on the posts. Any comment you make becomes a new post for you and goes on your profile page, along with your longer posts and passages from posts you have highlighted. Recommend posts you enjoyed to others by clicking the green heart at the end of the post.

You will find people responding to your comments and even starting conversations. This helps you get to know people and some genuine friendships can develop. You will also have people looking forward to your posts and following you so they don’t miss any. These are all people who may later want to read your blog because they feel they know you.

So what do you post? Anything that interests you and has general appeal. Personal opinions and experiences do well. Share information on subjects you know well from your unique perspective.  Use some of your photos to write photo essays. Are you afraid one of your content sites may close? Import posts into Medium, photos and all, with a single click. Save as a draft and publish when you delete from the old host. Just check your work for errors before posting. Many of your readers will be professional writers and bloggers.

Gradually, you will find your writing voice — that style your followers will come to expect from you. You will also begin to see what you seem to be writing about most. That means you are beginning to focus on your passions. It also means the idea for your own blog is in the process of hatching.

Monday Blogs, Link Parties, and Triberr

If you plan to blog, you should start by reading other blogs — a lot of them. You will get ideas on what is possible, themes you might want to use, how others monetize effectively. You will see what about a blog grabs your attention and what makes you click away. I suggest you follow @MondayBlogs on Twitter or search the hashtag #MondayBlogs . It will introduce you to a wide variety of blogs and you can start following those you most enjoy reading and commenting on them. It never hurts to become a familiar face to your favorite bloggers.

You may also want to join link parties after you start blogging.  My blogging friends Janice Wald and Kathleen Aherne are two of the hosts of the Blogger’s Pit Stop link party that starts on Fridays.  It’s another great place to read a variety of blogs and post a link to one of your own posts.

Triberr is another site where bloggers read and help promote each other’s blogs. I’ve covered Triberr at How to Promote Your Blog on Triberr. 

Are You Ready to Start Your Own Blog Now?

By now you should have some idea as to whether you should start a blog. If you seriously want to make money blogging, you will need to monetize your blog. To do that right you will need to host the blog yourself.

I would suggest using SiteGround (affiliate link) as your host if you plan to use a self-hosted WordPress site. Prices are reasonable. I just opened a new domain there and I’m getting my domain name free for life. I opened the account because I was unhappy with a current host for my main site. It was important to find a new host. SiteGround managed the transfer for free. So far their customer support has answered all my questions quickly and easily. Getting my new site installed was a snap.

If you have decided to start your blog, do it now and sign up with the Pajama Affiliates.   I took the Beginner Blogging and Affiliate Marketing Course. It includes a smaller course that helps you get your WordPress Site up and running in a day. I followed the simple directions in the videos to get mine up with a new host.

Do buy the course if you intend to apply what you learn right away. Then do the hard work of making your blog pay off.  You won’t be sorry.  No course is magic, but the Pajama Affiliate Marketing classes will help you.  Do yourself a favor and get the new Affiliate Marketing and Business Bundle now.

Why not start a blog today?

Earthquake in the Online Content and Social Blogging World

Update, February 1, 2016

Since I first wrote this, a lot more shaking has been going on. Bubblews is gone. It just disappeared a few months ago.  People who hadn’t backed up their work had no way to get it. Persona Paper announced at the end of January it will be closing. It is no longer showing ads or issuing coins. They will be paying those who are owed most as long as the money lasts. People are being given notice so they can make copies of any work not yet backed up. The owners of Persona Paper have acted with integrity, keeping members in the loop at all times. I am sorry to see the site closing.

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In the past two months online social bloggers and content writers have been scrambling to make the best of changes in their online world, I among them. Many who had written for Bubblews had their work truncated by the July 15, 2014 site update that eliminated everything written in extra content boxes or photo galleries. On these posts, only the introduction remained.

Squidoo writers were greeted in the middle of August with the news that Squidoo had sold out to HubPages and their work would automatically be transferred there unless they opted out. Many of those affected by this change were still madly editing their ruined posts on Bubblews to try to make sense of them again. Now they had to deal with making their former lenses into work suitable for HubPages. Shortly afterwards, Bubblews took away the ability to edit any post over 24 hours old, leaving a lot of angry writers who could not fix their broken work.

As I personally was trying to make the best of all this, I discovered Persona Paper and joined. It was everything I was wishing Bubblews was – except for the pay. No one could beat what Bubblews was paying. In spite of their lack of respect for their writers’ work, evidenced by what they did to it, in spite of payments taking longer and longer to reach them, in spite of the lousy writing interface, Bubblers kept posting because they couldn’t get paid as much anywhere else.

 

This month  whose writing their worlds on Bubblews find their world there rocking again. First came the announcement that pay would be going down and that those from certain countries would have to wait longer for payment than those from other countries. Then came the news that everyone would have to wait at least two months before they could get paid. They would also only be able to redeem once every thirty days, no matter how much was in their bank. There was another outcry when the number of views posts got stopped appearing.

Then, just this week, Bubblews decided that too many posted recipes had been plagiarized. This led them to say they would no longer pay for recipe posts unless the writer could prove the recipe was their own. They offered no way to present this proof. So most people have decided they will post no more recipes.

The only good news coming out of Bubblews this month is that Bubblers can now delete all those posts the update destroyed, without the financial penalty that used to make deleting bank-breaking.  Now we will also have to delete the ones we fixed before the editing stopped, since Bubblews “helpfully” restored all the text in our extra content boxes last week, including overwriting the edits we’d been able to make. Those posts restored all the obsolete portions we had edited to make them up to date. It restored all the references to photos that the site had deleted. Hardly anyone had used the extra content boxes to include only text. It would have been unnecessary.

Where does this leave Bubblers? Most have decided Bubblews is no longer worth their best efforts, since the site administrators cannot be relied on to leave their work intact. Posts aren’t earning what they were, and residual income is hardly worth mentioning anymore.

I used to make between one and two dollars a day most days, even if I had not posted anything new. Now if I make a new post, I’m lucky to earn a dollar in a day. On October 5, I posted one article, bringing my total number of posts to 841. My bank read $44.17 the morning of October 5. The morning of October 9, without any additional posts, my bank was reading $48.70. I had earned $4.53 in that time.

That isn’t happening anymore. I cashed out on October 14. leaving my bank at zero. By October 15, in the morning, it was reading $.68. Since then I have made two posts. Today my bank reads $5.12. So in the seven days between Ocober 15 and today, October 24, I earned $4.44. That’s an average of $.63 a day. Compare that to the average of $1.13 a day I made before the change with no new posts – all residual income.

CoinsBut what has happened at HubPages is even more dramatic. Between my two HubPages accounts, with no affiliate sales, for this month I’m making only $.22 a day residual income. That is with 137 featured hubs between the two accounts and no new hubs posted this month. Last month those earned $.39 a day. In April, the earnings from only the original account with 81 featured hubs, earned $.43 a day.

If I trace that account through from April 20, 2011, that account has earned an average of $.45 a day, but you must consider that on April 20, 2011, I had only four hubs and during the rest of that month in April, they were averaging $.19 a day. Most of my best hubs were beginning to be written in November of 2011 and the number of hubs did not start increasing much until 2012.

Enter Persona Paper. It’s new. I joined at the end of July. It’s requirements are much easier to meet than those of HubPages. It pays not only for the views on your posts, but also for comments of 30 characters or more which you make on the posts of others. Its threaded comments make real discussions easier than on either Bubblews or Facebook or Chatabout (a pay to post forum.) You always know who is answering whom about what.

What’s most important to me there, though, is that the owners of the site are themselves writers and they respect our work. To prevent spammers, spinners, and plagiarists, they read a sample of your writing before accepting you on the site as a writer. They are also very responsive to suggestions from members and reports of violations.

Their writing interface is almost as good as that on WordPress. You can use bold, italics, and other necessary formatting needed to write in accordance with common usage standards. You can also post multiple photos in posts at the present time, though as individual galleries get more crowded, that feature may not last. I have confidence that the owners will not take away what is there, but the ability to add more at at later date could go away.

But, you may ask, does it pay as well as Bubblews and HubPages? Not yet. When I started at the beginning of August with my first post, I was making an average of .06 a day counting comments. As of today, October 24, I have earned $5.84 and written 128 posts. I now earn an average of ten cents a day when I post. Posts only have to be 500 characters, but I usually write more.

Since I joined, the site has grown as more people are seeing Bubblews as a ship about to sink or a place they no longer enjoy the uncertainty of what will happen to their writing or earnings. While earnings at Bubblews and HubPages are going down, earnings at Persona Paper are heading in the other direction and slowly increasing.

I’m not ready to give up on HubPages yet, since I still believe it’s smart to have many baskets for my eggs.

If you have found some good baskets for content I haven’t mentioned, please tell us about them in the comments. I do moderate comments, but I will let appropriate links be shared to any sites I have not mentioned after I have investigated the sites linked to. I still have a no spam policy.

Photos (apart from those leading to Zazzle) are in he public domain courtesy of http://pixabay.com/