Tag Archives: SiteGround hosting

How to Make Backup Copies of Your Posts on Closing Sites

Niume Is Gone

It disappeared on October 2, 2017. I’m glad I made  copies of my work the instant I suspected it was on the way out. My sign it was fading was when they stopped paying. I started checking my backups immediately and they were in place by the time the site closed.

I usually make a backup copy of any important post when I publish it. I used to do this only with a text document. Recently I also started making copies as complete web pages as explained below. I like being able to see which photos and videos I used and where I put them.

How to Make Backup Copies of Your Posts on Closing Sites
How to Make Backup Copies of Your Posts on Closing Sites

 

Here’s How I Copied My Data

This will work for any site. Go to the post you want to copy and copy as complete webpage in your browser. I use Chrome, and this is how I do it.

  1. Click the three dots in the upper right-hand corner of your browser bar.
  2. Mouse over “More Tools.”
  3. Select “Save page as.”
  4. A “Save” screen will appear.
  5. Choose a name for your file and a folder to put it in.
  6. Make sure the “Save as” type says “Webpage, Complete” as in the image below.
  7. Here’s the image I snipped an image of that screen.
How to Make Backup Copies of Your Posts on Closing Sites
How to Save as Complete Webpage

I have a folder for blog backups and a subfolder for each blog or writing site. I normally make text files as I write posts now and save them — just in case. You can see I saved this under niume backups, and I gave this a file name. (In this case, I saved this edit page as the file name, since I wasn’t going to save it, just snip the process.) Although I usually have the text file files for my posts saved, I also like to save them as they looked online so I can remember which images I used where.

What Next?

Now you have to decide what to do with all your beautiful work. I will be trying to move it into my own blogs or websites. If you don’t have your own blog yet, I’d recommend hosting one yourself that no one can take out from under you. I use SiteGround for hosting my most important WordPress.org sites. Here’s why.

Web Hosting

 

I no longer use free blogging sites because they are harder to monetize and because the owners can change the rules or even disappear. Self-hosted WordPress sites offer features free sites don’t. They also give you complete control over your site. Of course, it’s up to you to follow Google or other advertiser guidelines if you want to monetize with ads. And you will also need to follow any rules your affiliated sites or networks set for their affiliates.

You may also want to check out these posts: Four Things You Need to Do When a Writing Site Closes and Should You Start a Blog?

If you have questions on what to do next, feel free to leave it in the comments. Or you may want to share what you plan to do with those niume posts. Godspeed on the next step of your blogging journey.

To stay in touch with your blogging buddies from every site, you may want to join myLot. It’s free and still pays a bit for participating in its discussions. Meet me there and connect.

How to Make Backup Copies of Your Posts on Closing Sites

**

3 Reasons Why I Chose SiteGround

I Know My Sites Are in Good Hands With SiteGround Web Hosting

 

I decided to use SiteGround when a Set Up WordPress Site in One Day class I was taking recommended it. I was planning to start a new WordPress blog, and I wanted to follow the directions the teacher was giving us. That new blog is A California Life. I was so delighted with the customer support from SiteGround that I decided to move my oldest and most important site away  from Hostgator to SiteGround. I still have a few sites at GoDaddy, but after the complaints I just read about them, I just may start moving those, too.

3 Reasons Why I Chose SiteGround
Click Image to See Current Pricing.

 

I’m very happy with SiteGround. I’ve never had any downtime during this few months I’ve been with them. I’m getting good value for my money. My sites are  fast and safe, and customer and technical support have been superb.

My SiteGround Sites Load Quickly

My sites have lots of images and all have sidebars.  My most important site built with WordPress has both pages and blog posts. Check out the speed at which Books to Remember loads for yourself. Since the home page is short, with few images,  I’m going to send you to a page full of images: Marvin Terban and His Books.

A California Life is a travel blog, so it also has lots of images. Solving the Problems of Aging is my most neglected blog of my SiteGround hosted Blogs, so I’ll send you to my one post there so far How Family Members Can Support Each Other. Go ahead and test them for loading speed.

I Know My WordPress Site is Safe on SiteGround

When SiteGround learns about new WordPress vulnerabilities,   it moves quickly to patch them at the server level. The SiteGround technical team quickly acted to protect customers from vulnerabilities in  ImageMagick , for example. They also quickly patched a serious vulnerability in WPTouch, a popular WordPress plugin. SiteGround was also the first host to apply isolation to sites in a shared hosting environment.

Web Hosting

I Left HostGator Because I No Longer Trusted Their Tech Support

After my satisfying experience starting my first WordPress blog at SiteGround, I decided to move my oldest site. I had started that site in 1996 as my bookselling site. It was long before WordPress existed, and I’d built it in FrontPage, which Microsoft stopped supporting years ago. The replacement for it frustrated me, and I wanted to concentrate on my business — not the software.

I finally decided to retire to affiliate selling instead of shipping out actual product to customers. I also made up my mind it was time to switch my site to WordPress. It was a 600+ page site. I had a copy of it in the software on my computer. I had good traffic at the time and I didn’t want to lose it, so I called the host, Hostgator.

We discussed the issues, and the support person assured me he would create a test site in  WordPress for me to work on  while the original site was still up. That gave me time to get some content on the new site before making the switch. He said when I was ready, I could call any tech person to make the switch from the test site to the real site. He didn’t mention any charge for this.

When I was ready to make the switch, I was informed it would cost $75 and take much longer than the first tech had told me it would. I was not a happy camper. It didn’t help that every time I called, I waited on hold for what seemed like forever. I no longer had confidence in HostGator.

Support crafted by SiteGround from SiteGround Web Hosting on Vimeo.

SiteGround Support Amazed Me

I called SiteGround. I had seen a promotional offer which included free site migration from HostGator. The customer service rep answered the phone almost instantly and walked me through the process of setting up the new hosting plan. She then took over the job of transferring my site from HostGator — for free.

I now host four sites on SiteGround, but one is not live yet. I know if I ever have a problem, I can make a toll-free call to tech support and someone will pick up the phone fast. I won’t have to pay for a call like I have to for GoDaddy, which currently still hosts my older sites. I won’t have to listen to GoDaddy’s annoying music until they pick up, either.

Isn’t it about Time You Tried SiteGround?

Say goodbye to toll calls and long holding times for tech support. Rest knowing  your website is secure. Celebrate fast page loading speeds when  people visit your site.

Here are the plans you can choose from.

3 Reasons Why I Chose SiteGround

If you only need one web site, I suggest you choose the StartUp Plan. I chose the GrowBig plan because it lets me host many sites on one account. See plan details here.  Which plan will you choose?

3 Reasons Why I Chose SiteGroundWhy not sign up now!

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?

Free Blog Hosting Can Be Yanked  Away Without Notice

Here’s how I learned the dangers of free blog hosting. A few years ago I almost had a WordPress.com blog deleted. At that time I did not know affiliate links were forbidden. I had never used them during my first two years  of posts, but I almost lost all my work by using that one link. Fortunately for me, they warned me and when I appealed and removed the link they gave me another chance.  Recently someone with more to lose than I had his free blog hosting yanked. His blog is gone. And that’s what inspired this post.

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?
Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?

Blogger’s Free Blog Hosting Has Risks

 In my last post I warned  readers about the need to host their own sites. Now I’ve just read that artist Dennis Cooper’s 14-year-old Blogger blog was pulled by Google with no warning. I will admit I am not familiar with Cooper’s work and I have no idea what about his blog violated Google’s  terms of service. I do know, though, from my own WordPress.com experience, that we may sometimes miss some part of the TOS or misunderstand it. That failure might cause the destruction of all our posts.

It’s one thing for Google to penalize content it doesn’t like in search results. It’s quite another to remove your blog.

Self-Hosting

When you own your own site, you have a lot more control. It’s  true  that paid hosting sites also have their terms of service, but they generally only disallow illegal content or behavior that threatens the server or other sites that share it. I use SiteGround for hosting my newest sites, and their terms are pretty typical. They don’t host MLM sites, though.

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?
Read the Terms of Service

Whichever host you choose, be sure to read the terms of  service before you  sign up. Make sure the  type of site you have in mind is compatible. Also read the details of your hosting plan to be familiar with its space and bandwidth limitations. You could be in trouble if you use too many resources. That happened to me on Hostgator once.

I once hosted my most important site, Books to Remember, there, but I no longer felt good about it after some problems with tech support. One person I talked to  made it sound like there would be no charge for a certain support task, and I should just call back when I was ready and any support person could help. I did that. After the task was complete they charged me $75 I had not counted on.

That’s one reason why SiteGround,  now hosts that site. Click link above or one of the sidebar banners to check it out. I heard from many others how reliable SiteGround hosting is and how helpful the tech support is. I have also found that to be true since I moved my site there .  I’ve always been happy with the results. My tech support call waiting time is also very short compared to that I spent when I was with Hostgator.

Before You Move to a New Host, Do This

Back up your blog. Back it up to your computer,  to the cloud, and to an external hard drive. If you do all three, you should be protected. (I am very happy with my Seagate Plus 4T External Hard Drive, pictured below. It has room to back up my entire computer and also my photos and important documents in additional files I can access without restoring.)

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?
My Seagate External Drive in Action, © B. Radisavljevic

Even if you  lose your hosting suddenly, you will have your content. It’s easy to export your blogs on a regular basis as XML files. In Blogger, click settings on your dashboard and select other. It will have an option to back up your blog. Click it and you will have your backup XML file. Save it wherever you want it to be.

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?
Screen Shot of Blogger Export

 

If you have a WordPress.com site, you choose settings again and at the top you choose export. Save to wherever you want to keep it. On a self-hosted WordPress site, choose tools on your dashboard. Then click export. I just exported one third-party hosted  Wordpress.org blog to a new site by just importing that file.

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?
WordPress Export Screen

My exported arrived blog with everything, even the photos, comments, and theme, intact. I decided to change the dates on all the posts and upload them one at at time to start the new site. That gave me a chance to edit the posts and improve them with what I learned from The Pajama Affiliates Blogging courses.

Set Up Your New Self-Hosted WordPress Blog the Right Way from the Beginning

I had already set up several self-hosted WordPress blogs before I discovered the Pajama Affiliates Courses. When I signed up for my new blog on SiteGround, I wanted to get off to a good start. I decided to do it while watching the 20 Pajama Affiliate videos in the WordPress in a Day Course.

I went step by step, with my blog open in one tab and a video open in another. I couldn’t believe how much I hadn’t known when I set up my other sites. I still need to make changes in those first sites I built, but at least I now have one that was set up properly at the beginning. This one isn’t it.

Check Content and  Prices on All Pajama Affiliates Courses. They are often on Sale.

I highly recommend the WordPress in a Day Course if you are just starting a new self-hosted WordPress blog.  I now own most of these courses.

It’s Time to Leave Free Hosting Sites Behind

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?

Back up your sites and move them to sites you own. The Pajama Affiliates can help you. If you have bought a course you will have access to the Facebook support group where you can ask questions and find answers to your blogging problems.

You simply should not risk all the work you’ve put into your blog by keeping it on a site you don’t control. Buying hosting and a domain name is a small price to pay to maintain your independence. Check out SiteGround. They often give you your domain name free for the first year if you sign up for a new site. They did that for me.

Web Hosting

Please share this post with someone it might help.

Does Your Free Blog Hosting Put Your Blog at Risk?