Tag Archives: tsu

What Happened to BlogJob?

What is BlogJob?

BlogJob is a social networking community. One can make friends, socialize, and discuss important topics with no minimum number of characters required. These discussions can take place in groups and in forums, as well as on  one’s wall.

Pro and Cons of BlogJob

BlogJob is more user-friendly than Facebook and tsu, though loyal fans of either of those sites will probably stay put even if they also join BlogJob. Facebook still offers groups I would not want to leave because they are important in my writing promotion. And, of course, family members and old friends aren’t likely to leave Facebook either. BlogJob is more of a blog host and networking community for Bloggers.

When I joined Blogjob last year, I thought it was a great place for new bloggers to start. One can write multiple blogs there with a WordPress interface. Bloggers can choose between hundreds of themes and customize them. One can use affiliate links with no problem, as well. There is an interface for putting ads on your blogs to monetize them.

There are some limitations on using third-party interfaces such as Easy Product Display and Amazon Native Ads. They just don’t work because of underlying coding problems. You don’t find out about the missing functions a WordPress user is used to until your site is built and you try to use them.

New bloggers used to be able to earn reward points  that could later be redeemed for gift cards or money in one’s PayPal account for each blog post. Those points combined with those one earned for the networking and commenting one does in the site’s walls, groups, and forums. *

Review of BlogJob.com

One knew that if one went to the trouble to make a 300-word minimum blog post, it wouldn’t be wasted effort because one could get at least a small financial reward. Not only that, because Blogjob is a community, your new blog, even now,  is likely to get visitors, comments, and even some help with promotion on social media if you did a good job.

Unfortunately many decided to put a lot of their writing eggs into the Blogjob basket and cut out some productive work on other sites.

Review of BlgoJob.com
Don’t put all your eggs in one writing basket. © B. Radisavljevic

 

I would not advise putting all your eggs into the Blogjob basket. If you want to be a successful affiliate marketer, this is probably not the host you should use for your main source of livelihood. If blogging for a living is your goal, see Why It’s Important for Affiliate Marketers  to Self-Host WordPress Sites.

I no longer recommend joining BlogJob, even if they open membership again. The site is now in flux and reward points have been “temporarily suspended.” Any money you make will have to come from monetizing your own blogs. As I write this today, I get error messages when I try to read posts my friends have shared — blogs hosted on BlogJob.  Many technical issues will have to be sorted out before the site is reliable again for blogging and promotion.

It appears many people are being patient, hoping the site will once again be what it was or better. I’m not holding my breath. Yes, I hope the site will solve its problems and recover, since it was important source of income for many who were close to  a payment threshold.

The administration said it will be paying those who have earned the required number of points. Some report they received their payments. Most are convinced the administration is honest and appreciate his telling them upfront what is happening. I tend to agree that he’s doing what he can to solve the problems . The question is still whether that will be enough and whether the site will generate enough  to bring advertisers back. 

Important Updates

*Update May 5, 2016As of May 4, 2016, the rewards system has been “temporarily suspended.” Members can continue to blog and interact, but will not be earning any more points until the site owner manages to fix some problems on the site. Members should still be able to redeem points earned if they have enough to qualify for redemption. Many voices in the forums say they will leave their work there and carry on as usual. Some are taking a wait and see attitude. Some are leaving. Membership is closed again.

The administration says the site migration to a new server killed traffic and he is trying to test various plugins to see if they are having an adverse effect on traffic and resources. He is hoping to get things, fixed, restore traffic to produce income, and start giving points again some time when all this is settled.

Update May 3, 2016: There is an application process in place now, and there is no guarantee of acceptance. Be aware that some people who have been accepted have received emails within 24 hours that their memberships have been declined.

An unwritten policy seems to be that you need to fill out a complete profile, including the bio part at the bottom of the edit profile page, right away and start a site or post to forums to let the administration know you are serious about adding content. If you have written for other sites with a good reputation, be sure to include that in your profile and link to any blog you might currently have elsewhere as your website. They want to know you are a writer, not just someone who wants to earn points by collecting friends and joining groups without adding valuable content to the site.

 

Review Comparing Bubblews, Tsu, and myLot

MyLot Back in the Game

The online writing community is abuzz with conversation about the return of myLot with its former owners in charge again as a revenue sharing site. Back in 2013, myLot was a vibrant community that had a forum to discuss anything and everything that was on members’ minds, as long as it was G-rated. People made friends. People recruited friends. People earned a bit of money as they got to know each other. I found out about myLot through online friends.

Then, in the first part of 2013, myLot’s ownership changed hands and stopped sharing revenues. They also changed the way the forum looked, and changed the rules to allow the sharing of links from which members could profit, and the site became spammy. Some people continued to be active, but many people left or stopped using the site, hoping that the site might someday become what it had been once again.

The Brief Era of Bubblews in Social Blogging

Them, seemingly out of nowhere, Bubblews emerged, inviting people to write their worlds. It sounded wonderful. Arvind Dixit said that the people who created the content, the little people, should profit from their work, and that he would share the ad revenues with those who accepted the invitation to “share your world” in posts of only 400 characters.

Bubblews became known as a social blogging site. People were paid a penny each for the views, comments, and likes they got on their posts – a rate that far exceeded what those who wrote for Squidoo, HubPages, and many other revenue sharing sites paid their members. Word spreads fast. Everyone said no one could afford to keep paying those rates, but many decided to concentrate their efforts on Bubblews for the easy money while it lasted. This is especially true of those who felt homeless after what happened to myLot and Gather, another site which had suddenly closed. People swarmed from myLot to Bubblews and were delighted with the pay rate.

Review Comparing Bubblews, Tsu, and myLot

 

Then, at the end of 2014, Bubblews announced they were not going to pay their writers what they were owed. Some simply were denied payments they had earned and submitted for redemption before a certain date in November. Bubblews administrators announced they were out of money and could no longer pay the same rates. No announcement was made on how pay rates would be determined. Many people just quit. Bubblews closed its site before the end of 2015.

 

Tsu Emerged as a New Social Network

Then, suddenly, tsu made its debut. I never made money there and found it a bit too busy for me. Many were very happy there, but many also left because it wasn’t a good fit. I got less and less active there because I found it overwhelming. In August, 2016, the site went dark, and its founder stated that those who had reached the payment threshold of $100 could email him, and he would pay them.

The Return to MyLot

 

At myLot There is Always Someone to Talk To
There’s no excuse for being lonely at myLot.

Now myLot is back in the hands of the original owners and the site is sharing revenues again. Not only are former members who had migrated to Bubblews returning, but they are bringing new friends they were close to on Bubblews with them. They are bringing people who used to write for Squidoo and who still write for HubPages. The result will be a more diverse membership that in the past.

So how do Bubblews, tsu and myLot compare now? MyLot is the only one of the sites that has survived.

Review Comparing Bubblews, Tsu, and myLot

 

MyLot is full of people excited to be back. They are earning their daily few cents again, and they are happy that they can cash out after earning only $5 as opposed to the $50 on Bubblews or $100 on tsu. Some of the old perks people had to earn (like being able to copy and paste and use emoticons) are now available to all as soon as they join. The old star system that made some people earn more than others is now gone and everyone is equal. One earns with all activity – posting and getting interaction on a post, and commenting on the posts and responses of others.

This is unique in the online world. On myLot people get paid for all their interaction on a post, and this encourages the long discussions that myLotters love. There is no set length a comment has to be, so people don’t say anymore than they need to in order to make a point.

MyLot requires members to write in English. It does not, however require that the English is proficient and many posts and comments can be hard to understand for that reason. It’s a great place for those studying English who want to practice.  You can join myLot here to party with us. MyLot does not currently have a referral program.

 

Review Comparing Bubblews, Tsu, and MyLot over the Long Haul